Clubhead Acceleration – Longitudinal Acceleration Or Radial Acceleration?

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Clubhead acceleration, the seventh of ten distinctions between the two prefect golf swings.

The two perfect golf swings are The Centrifugal Force Swing (swinging swing) and The Muscular Force Swing (hitting swing).

The seventh distinction is CLUBHEAD ACCELERATION.

In the Centrifugal Force Swing (The Swinging Swing), clubhead acceleration is achieved by a downward pull of the grip end of the golf club. This accelerates the clubshaft lengthwise, longitudinal acceleration. This longitudinal motion is maintained until the clubhead gets outside of a perpendicular line of the shaft with the ground. Once, the clubhead gets outside of this line, centrifugal force takes over and leads the clubhead into impact with the golf ball. This longitudinal acceleration begins quickly and the clubhead gains speed as it moves downward, outward and forward, through impact with the golf ball.

In the swinging swing,the club is accelerated in this precise order:

1. Downward pull of the hands starts acceleration

2. Centrifugal Force , the uncocking of the left wrist, adds speed

3. Right arm uncocking adds more speed

4. Body rotation adds the final acceleration

In the Muscular Force Swing (The Hitting swing), clubhead acceleration is achieved by a simultaneous downward, outward and forward thrust of the right arm against the clubshaft. This right arm thrust toward impact with the golf ball is radial acceleration. Radial acceleration starts out slow and builds speed as it moves through impact with the golf ball.

In either the centrifugal force swing or the muscular force swing the clubhead gains speed from the start of the downswing until the clubhead has passed through the impact with the golf ball.

In the swinging swing, from the start of the downswing through the follow through, the clubhead is always being pulled.

In the hitting swing, from the start of the downswing through the follow through, the clubhead is always being pushed.

Source by Howard McMeekin